Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Twin City Wrestling: A bit of lighter material for a change



With everything around here being so, well, HEAVY lately, I thought I'd put some of my other activity up here. It might be good for a laugh.

You may recall that I was working with a new wrestling promotion in the Halifax area a few months ago to publicize their debut and capture some of the highlights on photo and video. That outfit, NWAAtlanticCanada.com, seems to have trailed off into silence, but my fandom has not.

Along came another promotion, seemingly out of nowhere. Twin City Wrestling promised to bring the kind of action I'd been hoping for with NWA-ACCW: regular events at a fair price, run professionally, featuring capable local talent in simple, understandable and entertaining stories. Basically old-fashioned territory wrestling in the modern age.

I got in touch with promoter Cyril Richards and offered my services for their next show in Dartmouth. I went out with three HD cameras and an audio recorder and took some pictures and video. I don't have much spare time any more, but I've managed to edit three matches and some photos with commentary and graphics.

I think they turned out pretty good, considering it was an all-HD, three-cam, separate-sync job done entirely DIY by one sweaty dude!

Photos: Twin City Wrestling photo set from Dartmouth NS on Flickr.com\
Videos: Twin City Wrestling video playlist at YouTube
Follow: @TCWPromotions on Twitter

3 comments:

  1. That's awesome work.
    Super tight editing, shooting, voicing etc.
    What are the three cameras? (Handheld DSLR, the small HD one you bought back a while ago, and a third one...)?

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  2. Good eye, Brett! Thanks for the kind words.
    The moving camera is my DSLR, a Canon T4i with the 18-135mm STM lens. The wide fixed camera is the RCA EZ-cam I used for the running series...like one of those Flip cams. And the camera mounted on the ringpost was actually my dash cam! I took it off the mount and made a little next of electrical tape on the post as a base, then taped the camera down and let it roll. Looked okay and captured some neat angles!

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  3. Correction...nest...basket, basically. The post is a vertical pipe, so I needed to make something so the camera wouldn't fall down the hole. I made a * out of tape, put the cam on top -- upside-down -- and further taped the camera to the post for stability. It held well. I flipped the video in post and did an amateurish job trying to match colour and levels to the other, better cameras. I don't yet have the skills to do a seamless match between sources. Working on it.

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