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Stuff is changing, for better or worse

Today, the famous Armdale Rotary in Halifax has been changed to a roundabout. (Chronicle-Herald article.) The Yield-and-Proceed rules have been dropped in favour of ... just ... yield to the people in the inner circle. Much like life. The people in the inner circle have the right of way. So just wait your turn to get into the spin cycle. Not being a Halifax driver, I have only experienced the Rotary's mayhem from the passenger seat. Frankly, I'm not likely to notice a difference. However, I'm told that there have not been any smash-ups there today.

On Saturday, the Nova Scotia government will implement gas price regulation. Sure, it'll prevent prices from bouncing around like they did today -- $1.088/L in the morning, $1.145 at noon, $1.088 again right now. But the prices will go up or down every two weeks without warning of the direction. And depending on big swings in the New York harbour spot price, it could change more often than that. The Premier says the regulation will mean stability, and guaranteed profits for the retailers, but he certainly isn't promising lower prices for drivers.

This weekend, the Tories' 1% GST cut comes into effect. So, big spenders, get out and consume. From reading this Star article, I don't expect to see much of a difference in day-to-day stuff.
"Parking meters, taxi fares, vending machine items and possibly some new homes are unlikely to fall in price after July 1 despite a 1 percentage point cut in the goods and services tax rate effective Saturday. They're all products that are sold at a GST-included price, rather than having the federal sales tax added at the cash register."

Cigarettes and pinot noir won't cost less, either, as I understand it.

And, the Sunday Shopping debate continues. (Focus On The Family has its own "news" take on the subject.) Major grocery chains Sobeys and Atlantic Superstores have been opening more stores each Sunday over the past few weeks. The NS government says it'll close the loopholes in the anti-retail legislation by the end of this week in order to prevent the stores from opening. Pete's Frootique will get to stay open, though, since Mr. Luckett had been exploiting the loophole successfully before everyone else rejigged their stores to get in on the action. The Tories promise another plebiscite to decide the issue once and for all (again). That'll happen in 2008. Word is that Sobeys could be planning to defy the law, Paul Magder/Hy & Zel's-style, this weekend. As long as they're not strong-arming their workers to work shifts they don't want to, I say go for it.

Comments

  1. Changing the rotary rules isn't going to change a damn thing. No one ever followed the yield signs to begin with. These new changes make me more fearful for my life to go to Spryfield.

    ReplyDelete
  2. There is no need of Sunday shopping, come and visit our site.. and hear our side of the debate.

    www.saveoursundays.ca

    ReplyDelete
  3. "No need of"? What kind of debate is that?

    Please visit this spammer's web site, if only to chuckle at sos's weak command of the language.

    ReplyDelete

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